Hitman’s game

Assassin has students running scared

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photo credit: Kieron Hunter

Poisoned \ Players of the game Assassins must be cautious that their assassin hasn’t “poisoned” their drink with an X, causing their elimination from the game.

“She started telling a story of how she assassinated somebody this morning. I don’t why it was kind of suspicious, but I didn’t think anything about it,” senior Juan Serrano said. “I went to the restroom for five minutes and when I came back, I took a sip of my water that was on my desk and she yelled that I was ‘poisoned.’ I looked at the bottom of my drink only to find out that I was out!”

For a couple of years now the Assassin Game has been a tradition for upperclassmen to participate in. Each year a senior is chosen to be the front-runner of the games and controls all aspects of the game. This year senior Zac Perry is the chosen one.

The game is stressful. You have to constantly watch your back because you never know whose target you are. You can be assassinated anywhere anytime by anyone even if you know the person or not.”

— Luke Pendley, junior

People who participate must pay $5 to play. Once payments are made, Perry secretly assigns the name of a target who must be “assassinated” to each of the participants.

To “assassinate” players, they must either be “shot” with a water gun or “poisoned” by drinking out of a cup the assassinator has initialed.

Whoever is the last man standing gets the $180 pot.

“If I won, I would spend the money on a ton of lottery tickets so I could possibly make even more money,” senior Justin Young said.

Junior Justin Smith was junior Sam Wooding’s target and was hit with a water gun four days into the game.

“Sam followed me after my baseball game. I was walking home and he came out from behind the car and shot me with a water gun,” Smith said.

School campuses don’t allow water guns, so “shooting” targets is only allowed outside of school and off campus, but “poison” is allowed both on and off campus.

Proof of the assassination has to be sent to the front-runner on Twitter with a picture or video so that Perry can keep track of participants and so followers on Twitter can see who has “died.” The game ends when all but one target has been assassinated.

“The game is stressful. You have to constantly watch your back because you never know whose target you are. You can be assassinated anywhere anytime by anyone even if you know the person or not,” junior Luke Pendley said.