Learning+styles

Learning styles

Remote vs. On-Campus Learning: which choice did you make?

September 14, 2020

Wylie ISD is one of few districts in North Texas that gave their students the option of learning from home, remotely or attending class live in-person. Two students share their experiences with the learning style they chose for the first nine weeks of school.

Brianna Kim chose to learn on-campus

As a new student, learning at school offers this senior a chance to make new friends

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photo credit: Piper Deneault

In front of the class \\ Senior Brianna Kim listens to substitute Mrs. Tricia Johns in her English IV class fourth period Sept. 14. "As of now, I will continue to go to school. However, if [the] coronavirus pops up for the first time, then I think I will switch to remote learning,” she said.

A virus that has killed thousands of people as well as physically and emotionally harmed others combined with the start of a new school year, COVID-19 coronavirus has drastically changed students’ everyday school routine.

Students of Wylie ISD had the option of remote or on-campus learning. Nearly 60% of students returned to on-campus learning.

Senior Brianna Kim chose on-campus learning due to the fact that she is a new student.

“I decided to go to school because I personally would have no motivation to participate in school if I was online. I’m also new so I wanted the opportunity to make friends,” Kim said.

She, along with many others, do acknowledge the risk factors of being at school. 

“I think it’s still somewhat of a hazard to be at school. Not completely safe, especially with a lot of people not caring about the pandemic as much as others via not wearing masks correctly and not social distancing,” Kim said. 

I decided to go to school because I personally would have no motivation to participate in school if I was online. I’m also new so I wanted the opportunity to make friends.”

— Brianna Kim, senior

Students decided to stay at school unless a first case appears to preserve their health.

“As of now, I will continue to go to school. However, if [the] coronavirus pops up for the first time, then I think I will switch to remote learning,” she said.

For most teachers, planning out lessons that correspond with remote and on-campus learning is a struggle.

“I wish we could arrange for more planning/prep time because many of our lessons need to be rethought and it takes time for that,” physics teacher Mr. David Shipp said.

A majority of the people who chose to do on-campus learning did it for the interaction and to be able to see their friends. On the other hand, others did it because they were tired of being at home. 

“I hope that the school will implement some stricter precautions to make sure people don’t have Covid-19 (especially when students come back to school after any time of breaks or holidays). A health screening form is not enough, and people can easily lie,” Kim said.

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Jada Edmonds chose to learn remotely

To keep her family safe, this senior attends school online

Behind+the+screen+%5C%5C+Senior+Jada+Edmonds+participates+in+school+from+home+via+a+Google+meet+on+her+Chromebook.+Wylie+ISD+offered+both+on-campus+and+remote+learning+to+students.+Edmonds+chose+the+remote-learning+option+to+protect+her+and+her+family+during+the+pandemic.+%E2%80%9CI+thought+it+was+the+safest+option%2C%E2%80%9D+Edmonds+said.+%E2%80%9CIf+there%E2%80%99s+a+remote+option%2C+that+means+it%E2%80%98s+clearly+not+safe+to+return.+Plus%2C+I+get+sick+easily.%E2%80%9D

photo credit: courtesy photo

Behind the screen \\ Senior Jada Edmonds participates in school from home via a Google meet on her Chromebook. Wylie ISD offered both on-campus and remote learning to students. Edmonds chose the remote-learning option to protect her and her family during the pandemic. “I thought it was the safest option,” Edmonds said. “If there’s a remote option, that means it‘s clearly not safe to return. Plus, I get sick easily.”

For the majority of students, early morning routines continue to look as they always have: waking up in the early morning to the sound of a beeping alarm, getting dressed with drowsy eyes and shoveling soggy cereal into their mouths before rushing out the door for the drive to 3000 Wylie East Drive on the first day of school Aug. 13. 

However, for some students, school is only a screen away. 

Across America, students are beginning their first school year amid a pandemic. With COVID-19 coronavirus cases on the rise, Wylie Independent School District is one of the first districts opting to provide both an on-campus and remote learning opportunity. 

Senior Jada Edmonds chose the remote-learning option this school year in an attempt to protect her and her family during the pandemic.

“I thought it was the safest option,” Edmonds said. “If there’s a remote option, that means it‘s clearly not safe to return. Plus, I get sick easily.”

I don’t think [remote learning is] that different, because everything on-campus students are doing, we’re doing.”

— Jada Edmonds, senior

Despite having to attend each of her classes through a Google Meet call, Edmonds believes that she is getting the same quality of education as a student who is sitting in the classroom.

“I don’t think it’s that different, because everything on-campus students are doing, we’re doing,” Edmonds said.

The remote learning experience, however, is certainly far from perfect and has presented many struggles and tribulations.

“It’s hard when the internet at school isn’t working, and the teachers keep cutting out,” Edmonds said. “My economics teacher left in the middle of a call and never came back.”

Self motivation and concentration is already a struggle for students in the classroom, but has proven to be much more difficult when at home.

“My phone is a distraction. It makes it hard for me to focus,”  Edmonds said. “My nephew is also always coming into my room, so then I have to watch him and make sure he doesn’t get into anything. So half the time, I’m not even paying attention to my classes.” 

Despite these challenges, Edmonds has enjoyed her experience with remote learning and the freedom she has.

“I like that I don’t have to get dressed for school. I just get to relax,” Edmonds said.

Although Edmonds chooses to err on the side of caution by learning at home, she believes that the school is doing everything they can to keep on-campus learners safe during this pandemic.

“I think there isn’t much more they can do,” Edmonds said. “How it turns out is really up to the students in whether or not they will follow the rules.”

Edmonds said she does not plan to return to school at the end of the nine week grading period if students have the option to switch their learning plans. 

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