Honoring Black History

Clubs, organizations celebrate Black History Month

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photo credit: Jaylee Paredes

A glimpse into the past \\ Reading about the life of civil rights activist Ruby Bridges, students participated in Diversity Club’s Beauty in Blackness event Feb. 18. “I believe this event will accomplish spreading more information about African American history and things that happened in the past that we can now celebrate today,” club member Tiffani Garvin said.

writer: Gloria Olajimi, Staff Reporter

Black Americans have taken a past of imprisonment and transformed it into a thriving culture society now celebrated every February during black history month.

Students such as sophomore Izabella Neal celebrated black history through various activities held by different clubs and organizations this month. 

“I enjoy black history month because we can learn more from people posting facts about black history and you can see talented black people during the month,”  Neal said. 

From the arrival of slaves to the civil rights movement, students took a look into history in the African American studies class taught by Mrs. Rachael Carr in room (278). For one full month, students collected facts about historical, lesser known black figures to share during the announcements. 

“We hope to accomplish that black history should be celebrated beyond one month of the year which is why we started Jan. 31-March 1 with our announcements,” Mrs. Carr said.

I enjoy black history month because we can learn more from people posting facts about black history and you can see talented black people during the month”

— Izabella Neal, sophomore

Diversity Club celebrated black history in their Beauty in Blackness Exhibition Feb. 18. The exhibition involved a gallery walk in which students and parents could read about influential black leaders and creators. 

Students were invited to create posters about contributions in various fields made by Black scientists, engineers, doctors, educators, musicians, actors, and furthermore,” club sponsor Mrs. Jill Hill said. 

The club hosted games, performances and provided snacks for students and their families. Secretary Crei Pierson was happy to see the support the event received from the community.  

“I think that it is imperative to have these events because unfortunately, we aren’t given this type of information in our classrooms,” Pierson said. “I hope that the event made people listen and want to know more about black history.”

The school continues to remember black history beyond Black History Month through promoting inclusive activities such as the East Side Step Team. The step team, sponsored by Mrs. Lisa Olford, is a club for students to learn step, a dance style consisting of a collection of stomps, claps, and footwork created by black fraternities and sororities in the mid 20th century. 

“I decided to sponsor the club because I agree with the mission statement which states that the club ‘will promote academic achievement, student unity, and leadership within a diverse organization,’” Mrs. Olford said. “I am all for students looking within themselves in order to make a positive impact on campus as well as off campus.”

A young organization, the East Side Step Team, has yet to perform at any school events, but continues to fulfill its mission statement for students such as President Frances Frank-Nwafor.

“To me, the team is mainly about sisterhood, our strong bond and representing ourselves as black women which is the number one reason I was interested in joining,” Frank-Nwafor said. “Even though we haven’t performed in any events throughout the year, I enjoy making new friends, having close bonds with the girls, and having a sponsor to help us.”

Students believe it is important to take the time to remember how far the nation has come in terms of racial equality and hope the influence of these activities and events continues beyond the school campus.   

This country has developed so much since slavery and segregation,” sophomore Tiffani Garvin said. “I think we can continue changing in today’s world by trying to be equal and fair to each other.”