Like a girl

Captain Marvel faces unjust scrutiny

A+HERo+%5C+Captain+Marvel+breaks+boundaries+as+the+first+female-led+superhero+film+from+the+Marvel+Cinematic+Universe.+However%2C+due+to+this%2C+she+faces+unjust+scrutiny+for+not+being+feminine+enough.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Like a girl

A HERo \ Captain Marvel breaks boundaries as the first female-led superhero film from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, due to this, she faces unjust scrutiny for not being feminine enough.

A HERo \ Captain Marvel breaks boundaries as the first female-led superhero film from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, due to this, she faces unjust scrutiny for not being feminine enough.

photo credit: courtesy of Marvel Studios

A HERo \ Captain Marvel breaks boundaries as the first female-led superhero film from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, due to this, she faces unjust scrutiny for not being feminine enough.

photo credit: courtesy of Marvel Studios

photo credit: courtesy of Marvel Studios

A HERo \ Captain Marvel breaks boundaries as the first female-led superhero film from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, due to this, she faces unjust scrutiny for not being feminine enough.

Addie Orr, Editor in Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“You fight like a girl.” “You throw like a girl.” “Quit acting like a girl.” These common insults are constantly thrown around elementary age gym classes around the world. Tossed around by boys and girls alike, the meaning behind the phrase “Like a girl” is clear: girls are weak. Captain Marvel, the first Marvel solo film centered around a female hero, is aiming to prove that image wrong. Powerful images and clips of the hero have shown Carol Danvers (aka Captain Marvel herself) standing strong and mighty, with Marvel Studios going as far as fading the word “her” into “A hero.” However, this has led to unjust scrutiny of the few glimpses of the movie that have been released so far, with complaints ranging from actress Brie Larson being “too political” to her character Carol Danvers “not smiling enough.” Such accusations are simply uncalled for and decidedly sexist.

A new age where men and women alike will wish they could fight like this girl.”

— Addie Orr, junior

While those complaining may claim that those are just their opinions and that they would do the same for any male lead, this is simply not true. On the objection of Larson being too political, go look at Chris Evans’ Twitter (actor who plays the iconic Captain America), where his profile is filled with emotionally charged politics (and pictures of his dog). Similarly, look at every Marvel poster. Not a single one features the titular character smiling, so why should Captain Marvel’s be any different?

Contrary to these complaints, Captain Marvel should be celebrated for what it is: a movie meant to empower young girls and women across the nation. She proves that any girl can fight on their own, not just be stuck as a sidekick or damsel in distress. Ant-Man and the Wasp felt like a step in the right direction, with Hope Van Dyne (aka the Wasp) taking the stage but still sharing the spotlight with teammate Scott Lang (aka Ant-Man). Captain Marvel, on the other hand feels like a giant leap forward for women everywhere as she takes center stage and refuses to share in the spotlight, just as so many male superheroes have done before her.

When the movie opens March 8, comic book fans and casual moviegoers alike will pour into theatres to watch this heroine pull Marvel higher, further, faster into a new age. A new age where men and women alike will wish they could fight like this girl.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email