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Practice makes prodigies

Junior’s, senior’s artwork honored at Youth Art Month exhibit in Austin

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Practice makes prodigies

State of the art students // For junior Madison Clark and senior Olivia Scott, seeing their names on the list of selected high school artists in one of Texas’ competitive art exhibitions was “surprising” and “exciting.” Next month, both Clark and Scott’s artwork will be featured in the 2019 Texas Art Education Association (TAEA) Youth Art Month Capitol Celebration at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum March 3-17 and the Lower Rotunda at the State Capitol in Austin March 24-31.

State of the art students // For junior Madison Clark and senior Olivia Scott, seeing their names on the list of selected high school artists in one of Texas’ competitive art exhibitions was “surprising” and “exciting.” Next month, both Clark and Scott’s artwork will be featured in the 2019 Texas Art Education Association (TAEA) Youth Art Month Capitol Celebration at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum March 3-17 and the Lower Rotunda at the State Capitol in Austin March 24-31.

photo credit: B&E Photography / Liz Harkins

State of the art students // For junior Madison Clark and senior Olivia Scott, seeing their names on the list of selected high school artists in one of Texas’ competitive art exhibitions was “surprising” and “exciting.” Next month, both Clark and Scott’s artwork will be featured in the 2019 Texas Art Education Association (TAEA) Youth Art Month Capitol Celebration at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum March 3-17 and the Lower Rotunda at the State Capitol in Austin March 24-31.

photo credit: B&E Photography / Liz Harkins

photo credit: B&E Photography / Liz Harkins

State of the art students // For junior Madison Clark and senior Olivia Scott, seeing their names on the list of selected high school artists in one of Texas’ competitive art exhibitions was “surprising” and “exciting.” Next month, both Clark and Scott’s artwork will be featured in the 2019 Texas Art Education Association (TAEA) Youth Art Month Capitol Celebration at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum March 3-17 and the Lower Rotunda at the State Capitol in Austin March 24-31.

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Either pencilled in doodles or an extravagant painting, it takes a massive amount of creative training to illustrate a masterpiece fit for the capitol building. The stakes are raised when students compete against every aspiring artist Pre-Kindergarten through 12 in Texas.

For junior Madison Clark and senior Olivia Scott, seeing their names on the list of selected high school artists in one of Texas’ competitive art exhibitions was “surprising” and “exciting.” Next month, both Clark and Scott’s artwork will be featured in the 2019 Texas Art Education Association (TAEA) Youth Art Month Capitol Celebration at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum March 3-17 and the Lower Rotunda at the State Capitol in Austin March 24-31.

“This accomplishment is special to me because my artwork shows my passion and it made my parents proud that it got chosen to be selected for the TAEA exhibition,” Clark said.

Scott’s piece in this contest, entitled “Golden Lab,” was an acrylic painting of a friend’s golden labrador. The artwork features bright, golden paints and highlights her “passion for dogs.” Scott plans to attend Collin College in the fall. Scott is a member of National Art Honor Society. She plans to minor in art and continue her pursuit that stemmed from a young age by inspiring fellow artists who wish for her achievement.

This accomplishment is special to me because my artwork shows my passion and it made my parents proud that it got chosen to be selected for the TAEA exhibition.”

— Madison Clark, junior

“I was surprised my art was able to make it all the way to a state selection. It was exciting. I won a best of show at Celebrate the Arts last year, but it wasn’t as big as this,” Scott said. “Art helps me relax when I’m stressed, but when art is the reason for my stress, I start a new piece. [I advise young artists] to try new mediums and as many as possible because you never know what you could be amazing at until you give it a shot.”

The Texas Art Education Association has promoted student art across the state now 100 years after its founding in 1919. According to TAEA President Mel Basham, the corporation strives to continually promote student artwork of all ages and stands as an advocate for quality art education programs. To this day, thousands of students have submitted their art to the program and received tremendous awards including the honor of art in the Governor’s Gallery.

“I have grown as an art educator and learned the importance and value of visual art education for students in Texas schools,” Basham said in her President’s message on the organization’s website. “Texas student artists are my passion. We work continually to promote quality programs. We advocate for art programs – in all Texas schools – urban, suburban and rural.”

Clark’s piece selected for the exhibition was a mixed media piece entitled “Dragonfly.” She drew inspiration from her passion for her father’s illustrations. Clark was surprised about her accomplishment and felt beyond special because it made her parents feel proud of her art’s success. She plans to attend Collin College and later transfer to the University of North Texas after graduating next year, exploring her passion more as a hobby than a curriculum.

“I was really surprised because I have never been selected for anything art-related in a contest before. This is my first large art accomplishment,” Clark said. “Art is important to me because I am able to express myself and relax. My dad influences my artwork because he is a very talented illustrator and I look up to him.”

The TAEA hosted event will be open to the public at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum March 3-17 and the Lower Rotunda at the State Capitol in Austin March 24-31.

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Liz Harkins, Copy Editor

For all the people out there who don’t know me, my name’s Liz. I’m a clarinet-playing, AP-stressing and Spider-Man (and sometimes Flash) obsessing...

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